Nordy Translations

A person from Northern Ireland or Norn Iron, sounds a bit different from the Irish folks you lot are used to. At a concert recently, after i rather affectionately told someone to “watch yourself” I was told that I sounded aggressive! It’s not our intention to sound aggressive, Its because we have been forced to speak a language that isn’t our native tongue, so now we spend our time trying to dirty it up!

A is for…

Ach: Can be used a to start any sentence. “Ach how was last night?” ,”Ach it wasn’t too bad!”

Aye: Yes, “Aye I’d love a drink!”

Bis for…

Bake: Face or mouth. Normally not a positive reference, “shut your bake” “Would ye look at the bake on her?”

Banter/bant: Fun or Craic “Will we head out for a bit of banter?”

Banjexxed: an adjective meaning broken, “You may call the plumber, that toilet is Banjaxxed”

Beezer: Good, fantastic, Especially if you come from Derry “Your new car is beezer.”

Big Lad: A spritely young gentleman. “Alright big lad?”
Bout Ye!: Greeting, How are you? “Bout ye big lad?”

Craic/Banter/Fun

Craic/Banter/Fun

C is for…

Carry-out: LCBO or liquor store “Let’s go to the carry-out and buy some beer”
C’ mere: A command. “Come here”
Catch yourself on!: An expression, “Get a hold of yourself!”, “Wise up!”
Clinker: Similar to Beezer, if you’re not from Derry and are actually from Belfast. “My new bike is clinker.”
Cracker: Good. “That restaurant was cracker”
Craic: Fun, to have a good time. “The craic is mighty lads, get the beers in”

Cuddy: Young boy or young girl

D is for…
Da: Father. “I seen your Da last night”
Dander: Walk. “Lets go for a dander”
Dead-On: Good, decent, alright. “I like him, he’s dead-on”

Deadly: Really Good

Does my head in: Expression. Someone who really annoys you. “my da does my head in”

Yer-an-eejitE is for…
Eejit : An Idiot. “You are an eejit”

F is for…
Faffin’: Messing around, acting an eejit. “Stop faffin’ around and do some work”
Fegs: Cigarettes. “Can I have twenty fegs?”

G is for…
Grand: Good. “That’s grand, I’ll see you at half-eleven”
Guddies: Trainers. “Look at my new guddies”

H is for…
Haul: Hold. “Your man can’t haul his beer”
Hoak: Rummage. “That wee man hoaks through the bins”
Hole: Bottom, Bum. “Get your lazy hole out of bed and go to work”
Hoop: Bum, bottom. “You have a face like my hoop”

I is for…i dont know
I tell a lie: Expression, meaning you’ve made an error. “I tell a lie, I do know where it is”
Is that you?:Question. “Are you finished?”, “Are you ready?”
Is your head cut?: Expression, meaning are you wise? “you moved to Canada, without a coat! is your head cut?”

J is for…
Jammie: Lucky. “That jammie sod just won the lottery”

K is for…
Keepin’ Dick: Keeping Lookout. “Keep-dick for me while I rob this bank”
Kex: Underwear. “I have to go a buy new kex”
Knackered: Tired, done or broken, “I’m knackered after that walk” “Get a new car, that one is Knackered”

L is for…like
Lamped: Punched. “I lamped yer man after he called me a nasty name”

Like: Can start or end a sentence, so it’s kind of like a full stop “Like, I dont even like him” or “I don’t even like him, like.
Lump: Lazy, “Get out of bed you big lump”
Lifted: Arrested. “Wee Stevie got lifted by the peelers last night”

M is for…
Ma: Mother. “How’s your Ma?”
Melter: An annoying person who gets on your nerves. “That wee girl is a melter.”
Minger: Ugly, an unattractive person. “You’re such a minger”
Munter: An unattractive woman dressed inappropriately for her age and covered in fake tan. “Yer Ma’s a munter”
Mucker: Mate, pal. “Alright mucker, fancy a pint?”

N is for…il_570xN.688032465_tjnk
Naff: Stupid, crap. “Your new car is naff”

O is for…
Oul: Old. “This pub is really oul”
Oul-Doll: Old Lady. “That oul-doll looks like your Ma”

P is for…
Peelers: Police. “The peelers do my head in”
Poke: Ice-Cream. “Ma, can I have a poke with sprinkles on it?”
Pull: Go on a romantic conquest, usually on a Friday and Saturday night at a disco. “Right, pass my aftershave, I’m going on the pull tonight”

Pure: Normally used before an adjective, to give it strenght “I just ran up the stairs and I’m pure knackerd
R is for…
Ragein’
: Angry, fuming. “£15 for a taxi, I was ragein’!”
Ratten: Rotting, disgusting. “Those chips were ratten”
Reddener: Embarrassed. “I took an awful reddener when I missed the bus”
Right: Assertive, usually applied at the start of a sentence. “Right, I’m away home for my tea”
Runner: Run away, flee with speed. “Here come the peelers, let’s do a runner!”

S is for…
Scundered
: Embarrassed. “Look at yer man’s trousers, I’m scundered for ’em!”
Sound: Dead on, easy going. “Yer Da is sound”
Spuds: Potatoes. “Get the spuds on love, I’m starvin’”

T is for…
Tae: Pronunciation – Tea. “Put the kettle on and we’ll have a cup of tae”

Tara: Either good or bad. If someone says, “That’s tara,” and they sound glum, it’s bad. Likewise, if they sound happy, it’s good.

Tea: Dinner. “Jimmy, your tea is ready”
Till: To. “Are you coming till the shops?”

W is for…

Watch yourself: An Expression ” Be Careful!”
Wee: Small. Used by every single Northern Irish person.  “Have a wee bun”, “Would you like a wee bag?”
What about ye?: Greeting. “How are you?”
Wick: Stupid, useless. “Your new gutties are wick”
Windee: Window. “Someone broke my windee”

Wile: Really fabulous or really awful. As in, “Jeez, you’re looking wile.” So if something’s “wile craic”, it can be good or bad, depending on how the person says it!

Y is for…
Ya: You. “Ya look like my Ma”
Yarn: Talk. “I had a good yarn with your Ma”
Yer: You’re. “Yer my best mate”
Youse: You Lot. “Youse keep the noise down, I’m trying to sleep!”

What do you think? Are you constantly being picked up wrong?

Let us know if we missed anything out?

S xx

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